Posted on

shelf life of hemp seeds

What is the shelf life of hemp oil

The short answer is, if stored correctly, an unopened bottle of our hemp oil will last 14 months from the date of production. The long answer is there are several factors that can influence the shelf life of hemp oil. The major ones are how the seed is pressed, how the oil is packaged and how the oil is stored.

Pressing hemp oil to extend shelf life

Since the essential fatty acids in hemp are very susceptible to degradation and rancidity, producing a shelf stable oil starts with being very careful at the production stage. By ensuring that the oil has had minimal exposure to heat and to oxygen, the production of the oil ensures that the goodness that was available in the raw seed is retained in our virgin cold-pressed hemp oil. We do this through a production process that protects the essential fatty acids from exposure to oxygen by replacing the “air” in the production environment with pure nitrogen. In addition to protecting the oil from oxidation, we also ensure that the oil is kept well below the allowable temperatures required to be able to call the oil cold-pressed. These two factors enable us to produce a product that is as close as possible to mimicking the seed in it’s ability to safeguard the oil. You might consider our method better, since seeds can get broken, allowing oxygen to access the oils.

Sealed jugs devoid of oxygen extend shelf life

The oxygen free environment doesn’t stop at the pressing stage, we continue it right through to the bottling stage where the oil is maintained oxygen free and then the last bit of space in the top of the filled bottle is also replaced with nitrogen before the bottle is sealed with a foil topper and the lid is put on. These extra steps ensure that the oil will remain fresh for a long period of time after it has been placed in the bottle, literally for many months allowing us to set a best before date of 14 months from the date of manufacture.

Cold storage of the oil extends shelf life

Keep your oil cold. While we maintain an environment that is consistently lower than 15 C for short term storage of the products, we highly recommend you storing your oil in the freezer for longer term storage. One of the many wonderful benefits of hemp oil is that it will not turn to a solid at the temperatures reached in your home freezer so you can keep you oil there and it will still pour for you. There may be some separation of the naturally occurring waxes but this will just result in some cloudiness and is not something to be concerned about. It will not affect flavour or consistency when the oil warms.

Keep your oil cold and out of the light

The two things you need to be aware of after you get your oil is that you should keep it cool and out of the sunlight. Store the oil in the freezer for long term storage and in the fridge in the short term. The oil can withstand moderate temperatures, for instance while being shipped, without any significant degradation. For long term storage, just ensure you maintain a cold temperature.

Organic Hemp oil, Canadian hemp seed, Superior quality, best prices. Canada's #1 Hemp Oil retailer since 1996.

Everything You Need to Know About How to Eat Hemp Seeds

Image may contain Plant Food Produce Bean Vegetable and Lentil

Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods

As far as the nut and seed world goes, hemp seeds are like the straight-A student who’s also captain of the football team. A couple of spoonfuls of hemp seeds packs a serious amount of essential nutrients, they’re easy to eat and cook with, and they have a pleasantly nutty taste, like a cross between a sunflower seed and a pine nut. And no, they won’t get you remotely high. Here’s everything you need to know about how to buy and eat these little seeds.

Although hemp and marijuana are members of the same species, Cannabis sativa, they’re in effect completely different plants. There are about a dozen varieties of hemp plants that are grown for food, and all of them contain about 0.001 percent Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. This means you can eat as much hemp as you want and you’ll never have to worry about getting high or failing a drug test. Although certain states have begun to legalize the cultivation of industrial hemp in the last couple of years, the hemp seeds you can find at your grocery or health food store were likely grown in Canada or China.

Hemp plants grow brown popcorn kernel-sized hard seeds. Inside these hard seeds lie soft, white or light green inner kernels that are packed with essential amino acids, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids. You can’t really derive a lot of nutritional value from the unhulled seeds, so when you see a bag at the store labeled “hemp seeds,” what you’re actually buying is those soft inner kernels, also known as hemp hearts. Hemp hearts can be pressed to make hemp seed oil, leaving behind a byproduct that can be turned into hemp protein powder. You can find all of these hemp products at health food stores, or a well-stocked grocery store like Whole Foods.

Eating shelled hemp seeds, or hemp hearts, is as simple as sprinkling a spoonful or two into smoothies or on top of cereal, salads, or yogurt, says Kelly Saunderson of Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods, the world’s largest hemp foods manufacturer. People with gluten sensitivity can use hemp seeds as a substitute for breadcrumbs to coat chicken or fish. Just like you can blend almonds and water to make almond milk, you can do the same with hemp seeds for hemp seed milk, which you can use as an alternative to dairy milk in drinks and recipes. And because of its nutty flavor, hemp seeds make a great substitute for people with nut allergies—you can dry-toast them over low heat to bring out even more of that nuttiness.

Hemp seed oil should be used as a finishing oil, rather than a cooking or frying oil, since the delicate omega fatty acids will break down during the cooking process, stripping the oil of its nutritional benefits. Instead, use it to make salad dressings, or drizzle over pasta, grilled veggies, or popcorn.

Hemp seeds are considered one of the most valuable plant-based proteins out there. Here's what you need to know about how to eat them.