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manitoba hemp seeds

Manitoba Harvest

Manitoba Harvest is the world’s largest hemp food manufacturer to grow, make and sell their own line of hemp foods. They control every aspect of the production process from the seed planted, to manufacturing, to packaging, to distribution. “Quality seed to shelf,” as they like to say! Manitoba Harvest partners

Manitoba Harvest is the world’s largest hemp food manufacturer to grow, make and sell their own line of hemp foods. They control every aspect of the production process from the seed planted, to manufacturing, to packaging, to distribution. “Quality seed to shelf,” as they like to say! Manitoba Harvest partners direct with hemp farmers (many of which are also company shareholders) to source the raw, non-genetically modified hemp seed. Products are made fresh in-house at Manitoba Harvest’s state-of-the-art kosher and organic certified facility. They work with Renewable Choice Energy to offset 100% of their production facility’s electricity with renewable energy credits. Their natural gas usage is counteracted with carbon offsets.

Based in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Manitoba Harvest strives to manufacture the highest quality hemp food products, to educate on the nutritional and environmental benefits of hemp, and to support sustainability in all that they do. When you choose Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods and Oils, you can be assured of quality and environmentally conscious business practices. They’re proud of what they do and want you to feel good about it, too!

Shop online for Manitoba Harvest at Well.ca – Canada’s online health, beauty, and skin care store Free Shipping. We ship from our Canadian store to your door, fast!

Industrial Hemp Production

Background

Industry Background

Industrial hemp production has remained legal throughout most of the world. There are approximately 30 countries from Europe, Asia and North and South America that currently allow farmers to grow hemp. The world hemp fibre market continues to be dominated by China . Other notable countries include France, Germany, UK, Chile and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

There was a steady decline in world acreage up to the early 2000’s. In the 1930’s, the anti-marijuana crusade gained momentum in North America with the passage of an act in the USA that prohibited its use and circulation. Canada followed suit in 1938 with the introduction of the Opium and Narcotics Control Act. This was basically the end of hemp production in North America until the mid 1990’s. Hemp varieties with low THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) levels have been developed, and in March of 1998 the ban was lifted, permitting the production of hemp under license with Health Canada. Canada has adopted a THC level of 0.3% as the concentration that differentiates non-narcotic from narcotic cultivars. Most varieties being grown in Canada today have originated in Eastern European countries. In recent years, Canadian adapted varieties have been registered and are becoming available to producers. In Canada, Industrial Hemp is viewed as a new alternative crop that compliments prairie crop production rotations. It breaks the traditional crop disease cycles affecting cereals while offering enhanced cropping profits for farm businesses.

Manitoba Industrial Hemp Industry

Parkland Industrial Hemp Growers Coop Ltd. (PIHG) is a grower directed Co-op located in Dauphin. A plant breeding program has been initiated by PIHG with variety selection emphasis on high grain and/or fibre yield, large seed size and low THC levels. PIHG is a group of dedicated growers prepared to grow hemp for either grain or fibre and they will facilitate contracts for growers.

Fibre processing is in the development stages in Manitoba. At present, the Emerson Hemp Distribution Company is the only company that processes raw hemp fibre into specific useful components. Plains Industrial Hemp Processing (PIHP) is located at Gilbert Plains, Manitoba and construction was completed in 2013. They are currently testing their equipment and production lines. Contracted acres for fibre production will be available in 2014.

Manitoba grain production is summarized in Table 1. The data was taken from Manitoba Crop Insurance seeded acreage reports. Table 1 indicates the total acres licensed each year by Health Canada. Overall the industry has grown substantially since 2001 with some ebbs and flows. The increased production has been in response to the growing demand for grain and processed products. 2006 saw a significant increase in acreage due to a rise in contracts, high yields, economics and non contracted production. There was a decline in acres in 2007 due to the carry over inventory from 2006 and competition from more profitable crops. Acreage has been steadily rising since 2009 due to the competitive pricing options from processors. The data in Table 1 is updated in November of each year and may be subject to change.

Table 1: Manitoba Industrial Hemp Acres

Year Acres in Manitoba 1 Ave Grain_Yield per acre (Lbs.), MB 1 Licensed acres in Canada 2
2001 1,307 487 3,250
2002 1,498 560 3,778
2003 5,776 560 6,750
2004 4,348 264 8,721
2005 11,910 302 24,030
2006 29,865 578 50,767
2007 4,268 458 11,569
2008 2,452 506 8,049
2009 4,875 665 13,760
2010 8,959 247 26,800
2011 11,352 553 38,828
2012 15,709 795 56,543
2013 14,732 695 66,671
1 – Source: Manitoba Management Plus Program 2 – Source: Health Canada

Description

Stem Cross Section

Hemp Root
Hemp Root

Industrial hemp exhibits a dual response to day length. Increasing day length during the first two to three months promotes more vigorous vegetative growth. Later in the season, the plants require shorter day length to trigger flowering and maturation. Typically the plants require an uninterrupted dark period of 10 to 12 hours to induce fertile flowers.

Industrial hemp flower types are described as monoecious and dioecious. Monoecious plants have the male and female flowers on the same plant. The male flowers are arranged in whorls at the base of the flower head while the female flowers are formed at the top. Monoecious types are more common in French cultivars. To establish a monoecious population, it requires six to eight generations of selection for the “ideal” monoecious trait. A certain degree of yearly rouging is required to maintain “ideal” monoecy. The Sengbusch Classification system defines five degrees of monoecious forms: Type 1, 80-90% male flowers; Type 2, 60-70% male flowers; Type 3, 40-50% male flowers; Type 4, 10-30% male flowers; Type 5 less than 10% male flowers. The second and third types are considered “ideal” for monoecious cultivation. The predominantly male (1st degree) and predominantly female (4th and 5th degree) types are removed before flowering. 20-25% of self-pollination takes place in monoecious hemp. The methods developed by R. von Sengbusch and H. Neuer (1943) are the foundation of the breeding technology for monoecious hemp.

Monoecious Head Male Head
Monoecious Head Male Head – Dioecious

Licensing

Contact Health Canada for detailed licensing requirements.

Send completed license applications to:

THC Sampling And Analysis

As part of the license requirements for growing hemp, producers must provide proof that their hemp crop has a THC level of less than 0.3 %. This is done by hiring the services of a person approved by Health Canada as a hemp sampler. A list of approved samplers is available from the Health Canada’s Office of Controlled Substance website). It is the responsibility of the grower to make sure the crop is sampled if it is not on the Health Canada exempt list.

The sampler must follow the Health Canada guidelines outlined in Guidance on Sampling and Analysis of delta-9 THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol) in Hemp to collect samples, dry them and submit them to an approved Laboratory for analysis. The laboratory analysis determines the level of THC found in the crop sample and provides a report to the grower.

Market Potential

Currently the grain side of the hemp industry is the driving force for acreage. Fibre markets and processing capability is being developed with the first fibre processing plant contracting in 2014.

There are numerous companies in Manitoba that contract hemp seed for production of food and body care products. Food products include oil, dehulled hemp seeds or nut, milk, flour, toasted hemp seed, coffee, butter and protein powder. Body care products include shampoo, conditioner, hand lotion and lip balm.

Industrial Hemp Production Background Industry Background Industrial hemp production has remained legal throughout most of the world. There are approximately 30 countries from Europe, Asia