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how to hull hemp seeds

How to Shell Hemp Seeds

Whole hemp seeds are crunchy and difficult to eat because of their fibrous outer shells. In an attempt to make this dietary supplement a little easier to munch, the shells are sometimes removed. You may find shelled seeds at specialty grocery stores, but whole seeds are generally cheaper and more prevalent. Therefore, it helps to know how to hull your own hemp seeds.

Pour the hemp seeds onto the table, and spread them out into a single layer. Make sure they are relatively close together so more will fit beneath the board.

Place the board on top of the seeds.

Tap the board with the wooden mallet; hit it every few inches to ensure that all of the seeds are ruptured.

Pour the seeds into a bucket of water.

Stir the seeds vigorously, so the shells will float to the surface while the seeds sink.

Skim the empty hulls from the water until none remain. If a few seeds still have their shell, crack them individually with the mallet. Then return them to the water and continue stirring until all of them are shelled.

Pour the contents of the bucket through the colander. Collect the freshly hulled hemp seeds.

Warning

Do not smack the wood hard enough to crush the seed.

Whole hemp seeds are crunchy and difficult to eat because of their fibrous outer shells. In an attempt to make this dietary supplement a little easier to munch, the shells are sometimes removed. You may find shelled seeds at specialty grocery stores, but whole seeds are generally cheaper and more …

Everything You Need to Know About How to Eat Hemp Seeds

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Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods

As far as the nut and seed world goes, hemp seeds are like the straight-A student who’s also captain of the football team. A couple of spoonfuls of hemp seeds packs a serious amount of essential nutrients, they’re easy to eat and cook with, and they have a pleasantly nutty taste, like a cross between a sunflower seed and a pine nut. And no, they won’t get you remotely high. Here’s everything you need to know about how to buy and eat these little seeds.

Although hemp and marijuana are members of the same species, Cannabis sativa, they’re in effect completely different plants. There are about a dozen varieties of hemp plants that are grown for food, and all of them contain about 0.001 percent Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. This means you can eat as much hemp as you want and you’ll never have to worry about getting high or failing a drug test. Although certain states have begun to legalize the cultivation of industrial hemp in the last couple of years, the hemp seeds you can find at your grocery or health food store were likely grown in Canada or China.

Hemp plants grow brown popcorn kernel-sized hard seeds. Inside these hard seeds lie soft, white or light green inner kernels that are packed with essential amino acids, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids. You can’t really derive a lot of nutritional value from the unhulled seeds, so when you see a bag at the store labeled “hemp seeds,” what you’re actually buying is those soft inner kernels, also known as hemp hearts. Hemp hearts can be pressed to make hemp seed oil, leaving behind a byproduct that can be turned into hemp protein powder. You can find all of these hemp products at health food stores, or a well-stocked grocery store like Whole Foods.

Eating shelled hemp seeds, or hemp hearts, is as simple as sprinkling a spoonful or two into smoothies or on top of cereal, salads, or yogurt, says Kelly Saunderson of Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods, the world’s largest hemp foods manufacturer. People with gluten sensitivity can use hemp seeds as a substitute for breadcrumbs to coat chicken or fish. Just like you can blend almonds and water to make almond milk, you can do the same with hemp seeds for hemp seed milk, which you can use as an alternative to dairy milk in drinks and recipes. And because of its nutty flavor, hemp seeds make a great substitute for people with nut allergies—you can dry-toast them over low heat to bring out even more of that nuttiness.

Hemp seed oil should be used as a finishing oil, rather than a cooking or frying oil, since the delicate omega fatty acids will break down during the cooking process, stripping the oil of its nutritional benefits. Instead, use it to make salad dressings, or drizzle over pasta, grilled veggies, or popcorn.

Hemp seeds are considered one of the most valuable plant-based proteins out there. Here's what you need to know about how to eat them.